A Reservation Of Rights Alone Is Not Enough To Trigger Independent Counsel In California

Author:Mr Paul Killion
Profession:Duane Morris LLP

Last month, California's Third Appellate District added to a growing list of California appellate decisions holding that the mere possibility or potential for a conflict is not legally sufficient to require a defending insurer to provide independent counsel under California's Cumis statute, Civil Code section 2860. Simply because the insurer sent a reservation of rights letter is not enough.

In Centex Homes v. St. Paul Fire and Marine Ins. Co. (1/22/2018, No. C081266) __Cal.App.5th __, the Third District addressed a dispute between insurer St. Paul and a developer, Centex Homes, regarding whether the insurer was required to provide independent counsel to defend Centex against actions brought by several homeowners alleging construction defects. St. Paul insured one of Centex's subcontractors—Ad Land Venture—and Centex tendered the lawsuits to St. Paul for defense. St. Paul agreed to defend, subject to certain reservations of rights, including St. Paul's right to deny indemnity to Centex for any claims by the homeowners not covered by the policy, including claims for damage to Ad Land's work and damage caused by the work of other subcontractors not insured by St. Paul. St. Paul appointed a defense attorney to defend Centex in the underlying actions, but Centex claimed St. Paul's reservation of rights created a conflict requiring St. Paul to pay for independent counsel under California Civil Code section 2860.

Centex essentially argued that a right to independent counsel exists whenever an insurer reserves rights. The Third District disagreed. Quoting Gafcon, Inc. v. Ponsor & Associates (2002) 98 Cal.App.4th 1388, 1421, the court explained, "a conflict of interest does not arise every time the insurer proposes to provide a defense under a reservation of rights. There must also be evidence that 'the outcome of [the] coverage issue can be controlled by counsel first retained by the insurer for the defense of the [underlying] claim.'" The court rejected the contention that defense counsel in a construction defect case could control the outcome of the coverage case. (Centex, supra, at p.13-14.)

A conflict of interest exists "only when the basis for the reservation of rights is such as to cause assertion of factual or legal theories which undermine or are contrary to the positions to be asserted...

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