Litigation Tourists Visit New York And Are Sent Packing

Author:Mr Eric Alexander
Profession:Reed Smith
 
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A few weeks ago, we reported on another in a line of Missouri appellate decisions rejecting the ability of Missouri courts to try the claims of non-Missouri residents against non-Missouri manufacturers of baby powder not used in Missouri. The next day a jury in the same trial court awarded billions in a trial of 22 baby powder users. This was all part of a long saga of litigation tourism to the Show Me State.

It turns out that some plaintiffs prefer to go ever upwards with their baby powder claims in New York state court. We are not talking about New York residents suing in their friendly neighborhood court, we are talking about litigation tourists coming to the Big Apple with hopes of big awards. The problem-for them-is that New York state courts are supposed to apply personal jurisdiction according to the same standards that the Missouri appellate courts and the United States Supreme Court have been lately. We received two very similar decisions from a friend of the blog, Thomas Kurland of Patterson Belknap, that address personal jurisdiction for claims against the manufacturers of baby powder by people with no particular connection to where they were suing. The difference from the baby powder cases from Missouri and New Jersey that we have discussed before is that these plaintiffs claimed mesothelioma from asbestos allegedly in baby powder they had used.

The first case, Hammock v. Avon Prods., Inc., No. 190215/2016, 2018 WL 3601393 (N.Y. Super. Ct. July 27, 2018), has been published and came out a few days before the second, Crozier v. Avon Prods., Inc., No. 190385/2016 (N.Y. Super. Ct. July 31, 2018). The issues and analyses were almost identical, so we will discuss them together and skip pinpoint cites. The plaintiff in Hammock claimed exposure to the decedent from use of baby powder on herself, her children, and patients where she worked over the span of more than 35 years. All of the exposure, and any purchasing the decedent did, occurred in Virginia, where she lived. The plaintiff in Crozier claimed use of baby powder and a related cosmetic product when she was an infant and a teenager. All use and purchasing of the products was in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas.

Both plaintiffs brought suit in New York state court against a number of defendants. We report on the motion in each case of the manufacturer and distributor of the baby powder, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc., and its holding company parent. Neither of those entities was...

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