hiQ v. Linkedin Redux? Ninth Circuit Decision Tested In New Case

Author:Mr Jeffrey Neuburger
Profession:Proskauer Rose LLP
 
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The ink is barely dry on the landmark Ninth Circuit hiQ Labs decision. Yet, a new dispute has already cropped up testing the bounds of the CFAA and the ability of a platform to enforce terms restricting unauthorized scraping of social media content. (See Stackla, Inc. v. Facebook, Inc., No. 19-5849 (N.D. Cal. filed Sept. 19, 2019)). This dispute involves Facebook and a social media sentiment tracking company, Stackla, Inc., which, as part of its business, accesses Facebook and Instagram content. This past Wednesday, September 25th, the judge in the case denied Stackla, Inc.'s request for emergency relief restoring its access to Facebook's platform. While the judge has yet to issue a written ruling, the initial pleadings and memoranda filed in the case are noteworthy and bring up important issues surrounding the hot issue of scraping.

The Stackla dispute has echoes of hiQ v LinkedIn. Both involve the open nature of "public" websites (although the "public" nature of the content at issue appears to be in dispute.) Both disputes address whether the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (the "CFAA") can be used as a tool to prevent the scraping of such sites. Both disputes address how a platform may use its terms of use to prohibit automated scraping or data collection beyond the scope of such terms, although the discussion in hiQ was extremely brief. And like hiQ, Stackla asserts that if not for the ability to use Facebook and Instagram data, Stackla would be out of business. Thus both disputes address whether a court's equitable powers should come into play if a platform's termination of access will result in a particular company's insolvency. Given the Ninth Circuit's opinion in favor of hiQ, it is highly likely that Stackla's lawyers believed the Ninth Circuit decision was their golden ticket in this case. The judge's ruling on the request for emergency relief suggests they may be disappointed.

Stackla collects social media content on behalf of brands. Facebook offers an application program interface (an "API") to allow third party developers to access Facebook and Instagram content. In May 2019, Stackla was approved as an Official Facebook Marketing Partner (FMP) after an extensive review of its business and advertising practices, giving it what it considered a stamp of approval as a vetted partner that met "the highest standards of performance."

After an online news organization published articles that questioned the scraping practices of certain...

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